Eugene Mobarry Fine Art

Hello! I have a long but interesting story to share about my journey

As far back as I can remember I’ve been an artist. Even before I entered grade school, I’d sit on the floor of my parents’ home and draw pictures on scrap paper. At that time, knights and castles were the subjects which interested me. All through grade school and high school, I worked in pen and pencil, sometimes creating posters for friends from album covers. The art on the albums of Meatloaf, Kiss, and Queen were some of my favorites. As far back as I can remember I’ve been an artist. Even before I entered grade school, I’d sit on the floor of my parents’ home and draw pictures on scrap paper. At that time, knights and castles were the subjects which interested me. All through grade school and high school, I worked in pen and pencil, sometimes creating posters for friends from album covers. The art on the albums of Meatloaf, Kiss, and Queen were some of my favorites.


I went to Northern Kentucky University and studied commercial art for four years. Wheeler Dealer magazine offered me a job as a paste-up artist in 1983. The job paid $3.45/hour and I was told during the interview that a degree wasn’t necessary for the position. I didn’t finish the degree. After working about eight months, I was approached by someone who wanted to start a 50’s/60’s Rock & Roll band. I could carry a tune and had taken acting and dance classes in college so I thought it would be fun. It turned out to be very profitable. We called ourselves HotWax and started traveling throughout the southern states.

As you may know, the South features some marvelous architecture. Having an interest in structures, I started sketches and ink paintings of many of the historic homes I saw. My music paid well enough to allow me to earn an associate degree in Architectural Engineering at Cincinnati Technical College (now Cincinnati State Technical and Community College) in 1993. By that time, CADD (computer-aided design and drafting) had replaced board drafting and it killed a lot of the creativity for me.

To keep my sanity, I started doing portrait work in colored pencil and ink. I never tried to make a living at it because I was far too slow and had never learned the techniques employed by “classic” portrait painters. I created portraits for family and friends. After moving to Las Vegas in 2004, I switched to oil paint. My last two portraits were full of symbolism to enhance the pieces as well as to reflect my relationship with the models and their country of origin.

By 2005, I started dabbling in abstractions, both in ink and paint. I’ve always been a seeker of knowledge and meaning, and I’ve read numerous books on Eastern philosophy, spirituality, and science. Through these various disciplines, I believe that a consensus can be achieved to reach some understanding of why we are here and the meaning of existence.

Since the ending of my 30 years in the music industry I have been working diligently on not being a starving artists while trying to understand and perfect my creativity; master myself;  and adapt to this new world that I (a self-proclaimed man of antiquity or "old school dinosaur" as the kids call me) find myself in.  I joined a collaborative of like-minded artists at the Art House in Fort Thomas in January 2015 to further my career and endeavors as an artists.    


Currently, I am creating a series of ink drawings that more deeply inculcate science, both metaphysical and physical,  into my work.  My paintings and drawings, however, deal with reality from a more metaphysical perspective on a level where the viewer can understand without being ostracized or turned off by my intentions or the meaning of my work. I am bringing complex metaphysical subject matter into an easily digestible state...some of which unintentionally matches the color of your couch or accentuates that space in your front foyer.  My clients can easily detect that there is some overlap  of disciplines that merge into each other on a deeper, yet more basic level. Think: the wayward love child of M.C. Escher and Buddha with the simplest of art tool. 

Although many of my pieces are left up to the interpretation of the observer, I prefer that my pieces maintain a specific meaning; a meaning that I want to share with my audience.  In that light, I’ve included descriptions of each piece so that the message I intend to convey will be readily understood. Please enjoy the journey...

Eugene R. Mobarry